• Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools in the Eastern Cape
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. Because the Eastern Cape is one of the mainly rural Provinces, it is expected that most schools will have a large number of learners from low income communities who are in dire need of sanitary pads and so many other things. We appreciate the interventions by government to assist these learners and further call for the provision of pads to help keep the girl child in school and learning. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    20 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools around Gauteng
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    321 of 400 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in [put the name of your municipality here]
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide. * This campaign by amandla.mobi is supported by Heinrich Böll Stiftung.
    10 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Vusi Sodiye
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in uMdoni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Surayya Ebrahim
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in Msukaligwa Local Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Bonginkosi Lucky Duba
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in uMgungundlovu District Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    7 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Siyabonga Mbanjwa
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in AbaQulusi Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Phumlani Mangethe
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in Emalahleni Local Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    29 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Chris Van Rooyen
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in Mogale City Local Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Alan Exton
  • City of Tshwane Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan
    On the 9th November 2016, Tshwane, Joburg and Ekurhuleni were hit by severe flash floods where 6 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that Municipalities are caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management Directorate is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan the Municipality will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
    79 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Ekurhuleni Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan.
    On the 9th November 2016, Germiston, Johannesburg and Tshwane were hit by severe flash floods where 4 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that our Municipality is caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management Directorate within Minucipalities is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan Municipalities will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
    56 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • STOP TAXING OUR PERIOD
    Have you ever wondered about the impact of a woman's period on society? For many women around the globe and in particular our home country South Africa, this is a daily challenge, especially when trying to have access to affordable sanitary wear. At present the majority of women around the world are currently on a menstrual period and there are millions of women who do not have access to this basic necessity, especially our school-going young women, who can ill-afford to miss school during their developing years. Those who can afford sanitary wear, are then subjected to paying tax on acquiring a basic necessity to feel clean and comfortable, during a period. With the escalating price of sanitary towels it would be most welcoming if our government can drop the tax on this very important commodity. In order to grow a self-sustainable country we need to ensure that we create a strong foundation and that is investing in our future generation. The women of our country serve the backbone of our economy and if we cannot ensure their well-being then the cycle of poverty is perpetuated. Please SIGN THE PETITION TO STOP TAXING OUR PERIOD
    91 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Cecilé-Ann Pearce Picture