• Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools in the Northern Cape
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools in Limpopo
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    17 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools in the North West
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    5 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Prioritize sustainable provision of sanitary pads in quintile 1-3 schools around Gauteng
    On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [1]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Last year, we watched as Parliament introduced Max, the flavoured condoms. While efforts aimed at reducing the rate of HIV/AIDS are commendable, we cannot ignore the plight of the girl child who loses her dignity and time for her studies for something she cannot opt out on. “You have to enable that child to go to school every day because the concern is that women are illiterate. If (not having access to) sanitary towels make girls not go to school, it should be your primary concern” ANC MP Patricia Chueu. [1] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
    321 of 400 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • #JUSTICEFORVUYI - SAY NO TO BAIL for Femicide Accused
    On 2 January 2017, a strong, beautiful and tenacious young woman, with a heart made only of gold, was taken from us. A bright light in the lives of all who knew her, this loving mother of three children, was brutally assaulted and killed by her husband in Westlake, Cape Town. This mother of three was allegedly stabbed in full view of the community by her husband and residents claim he had been abusive towards her. South Africa has a femicide rate five times higher than the global average. “Research proves that the chances of a woman being murdered by someone that she knows or is in an intimate relationship with are much higher than any other type of murder… Motives are often financial, adultery or a love-triangle, custody or a residential battle for children.” – Anni Hesselink. In the words of community leader Vusumzi Nelani “This is a very sad case. This is what happens to many women and if the court is lenient this abuse will continue so we want the court to take this case very serious.” (News24, 26/07/2017) Please take a few minutes to sign today if you can. There are witnesses and three vulnerable young children we need to protect!! If we want our voices against domestic violence to count, we need them to count in court too!! Please share this link for friends, family and colleagues to sign. Thank you very much.
    693 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Nicole Elliott
  • Tell Treasury to increase the national budget for mental health
    What we all want for ourselves and our families is to live our lives in good mental health, and to know that when we need help, we can get it. But in South Africa today we see signs that our public mental health system is heading toward crisis. The lack of Government funding means those most in need are experiencing long waiting times for support; staff are increasingly forced to rely on the use of isolation as a form of care; and the country is experiencing alarmingly high levels of suicide. With the recent deaths of more than 94 people because government had to cut down on their spending and divert monies to other areas. These deaths which could have been prevented, have shown us that more needs to be spent to ensure the well-being of our mental patients. Developing countries have unique challenges which include people experiencing trauma, injury, violence as well as the burden of infectious diseases, harsh economic circumstances and poor living conditions [1]. South Africa is no exception given decades of institutionalized violence and oppression for the majority of its citizens. But mental health care takes the backseat when it comes to the allocation of resources. South Africa has a history of being unkind to its vulnerable populations, especially those who have mental disorders. “Mental health care is underfunded and under-resourced. There are are not enough trained mental health professionals. In 2010, South Africa had 1.58 psycho-social providers for every 100,000 people. In the same period, Argentina had 13.19 psycho-social providers for every 100,000 people. The World Health Organisation recommends that South Africa increase its psycho-social professionals by 2937. [1]” The country has relied heavily on psychiatric hospitals to care for and manage mentally ill patients. This is problematic because public sector mental health care services are not accessible to the country’s most vulnerable populations. The hospitals also don’t have enough trained mental health professionals. With the 2017 budget speech coming up, we can use the moment to rally support for an increase in government expenditure for mental health. The National Treasury working together with the Ministry of Finance must make more funds available for mental health care. The deaths of the Life Esidimeni patients should prompt the government into immediate action.
    566 of 600 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Release the Life Esidimeni Report
    The Health Ombudsman has granted the MEC for Health Qedani Mahlangu time to consult with her legal team [1] and have ignored the pain of the families who have lost their loved ones. By this decision, he has prolonged the mourning, the pain of losing a loved one and closure for these families. Family members have voiced out their disappointment and dissatisfaction at this decision [2]. It is unjust and any procedures that allow for this to happen are equally unjust and must be questioned. [1] http://ewn.co.za/2017/01/16/esidimeni-report-into-psychiatrist-patients-death-looms [2] http://ewn.co.za/2017/01/17/relatives-disappointed-over-esidimeni-interim-report-delay
    44 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Hon. Minister Masutha EXTEND the deadline on the Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill
    Just recently, the body of 22-year-old LGBTQ activist Noluvo Swelindawo was found near the N2 highway in Driftsands, a community near Khayelitsha. She had been shot in an alleged hate crime. It is in this light this, and many other cases of ongoing hate crimes against the LGBTI community that we welcome Cabinet’s approval to publish the Prevention and Combating of Hate Crimes and Hate Speech Bill for public comment. The Bill tackles a number of highly complex issues that require consultation with those most affected by the changes - if it is to achieve its stated aims to prevent and combat deaths like Noluvo's - and a proper consultation process takes time. We have waited for many years for the public release of the bill, and it is of utmost importance that the public consultation period allows civil society and the public in general to thoroughly and meaningfully engage with the bill and its potentially far-reaching provisions. After it has taken government nearly four years to draft the Bill, it is alarming that the public has been given a mere five weeks (until 1 December 2016) with a short extension over the holiday season (to 31 January 2017) to comment thereon. If the purpose is to craft an effective bill, the state needs to commit to coordinate robust public engagement and undertake in a process of deep reflection to ensure that the bill that is passed is the best bill possible. The current timeline does allow us to attempt to reach this ideal. As such, we are calling on the Department of Justice (DoJ) to extend the deadline for public comment to the 30 June 2017. We further request clear and detailed information on DoJ’s plan for convening extensive public consultations with representatives from civil society, non-governmental and community-based organisations and interested individuals on the draft bill.
    325 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Iranti-org and Forum for the Empowerment of Women
  • Tell Parliament to support the tax on sugary drinks
    Sugary drinks are one of the most significant contributors to health problems such as diabetes, obesity, heart diseases, certain cancers and dental decay in the world and in South Africa. Last year, the Minister of Finance announced a plan to tax sugary drinks such as soft drinks, energy drinks, fruit drinks and sweetened milks by April 2017. (Pure fruit juice and milk will be excluded from the tax.) The Parliamentary committees discussing this issue are under pressure to drop this proposal, lower the tax rate, and exempt more products. Beverage companies and retail groups are flooding Parliament with comments to prevent this policy, urging exemptions and weaker regulation. That’s why Parliament needs to hear from YOU to make sure the final policy is strong and effective in lowering the consumption of harmful sugars in beverages. South Africa is already ranked the most obese country in sub-Saharan Africa. Excess sugar consumption is a major cause of obesity and its related diseases, as excessive sugar intake causes increased risk of diabetes, liver and kidney damage, heart disease, some cancers and dental caries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) and the World Cancer Research Fund recommend that people should consume no more than 10% of total calories from sugar. Sugary drink consumption is also linked to under-nutrition. In many African countries, including South Africa, babies are given sugary drinks as a weaning food or even as a substitute for infant formula, which increases under-nutrition and stunting. Stunted infants have a much greater risk of becoming obese and diabetic.
    197 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Concerned citizens Picture
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in [put the name of your municipality here]
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide. * This campaign by amandla.mobi is supported by Heinrich Böll Stiftung.
    10 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Vusi Sodiye
  • Stop being secretive about the Nuclear power deal.
    The secrecy around Mzansi's Nuclear power plan, leaves much to be desired. It does not allow for those it will impact on to make an informed choice on whether they approve of it or not. It should concern all of us that the Department of Energy has failed its responsibility to provide the public with all the relevant information needed to make appropriate energy choices, with enough time to consider all the options available. Nuclear energy is much more expensive than solar and wind. The amount of money that will be invested if the nuclear deal goes ahead means that our country could well and truly become bankrupt. To build a nuclear plant optimistically takes 10 years and often much longer[1]. Is it fair to keep our people who do not have electricity access waiting for another decade/ CSIR and other scientific bodies suggest that this nuclear deal will be a disaster and will not create jobs as being promised similar to how the arms deal promised jobs but did not deliver. Instead a handful of politically connected people got rich at the expense of the poor. For starters, investing in renewable energy could deliver many more jobs than nuclear will be good for job creation as well as generating energy safely, cleanly and cheaply but this seems not to be considered and opens the energy space for much plundering. So in summary the nuclear deal is too expensive, too dangerous and will deliver too little too late to address the absence of electricity provision. The poor in our country are being betrayed by a deal at best will only benefit the needs of a few industries and at worst only benefiting those that stand to make money out of this deal. Nuclear energy is going to affect us and the future generations. We must get involved now before its too late. [1] http://mg.co.za/article/2015-11-05-why-south-africa-should-not-build-eight-new-nuclear-power-stations
    2,721 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in uMdoni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    4 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Surayya Ebrahim