• Ekurhuleni Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan.
    On the 9th November 2016, Germiston, Johannesburg and Tshwane were hit by severe flash floods where 4 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that our Municipality is caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management Directorate within Minucipalities is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan Municipalities will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
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    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • STOP TAXING OUR PERIOD
    Have you ever wondered about the impact of a woman's period on society? For many women around the globe and in particular our home country South Africa, this is a daily challenge, especially when trying to have access to affordable sanitary wear. At present the majority of women around the world are currently on a menstrual period and there are millions of women who do not have access to this basic necessity, especially our school-going young women, who can ill-afford to miss school during their developing years. Those who can afford sanitary wear, are then subjected to paying tax on acquiring a basic necessity to feel clean and comfortable, during a period. With the escalating price of sanitary towels it would be most welcoming if our government can drop the tax on this very important commodity. In order to grow a self-sustainable country we need to ensure that we create a strong foundation and that is investing in our future generation. The women of our country serve the backbone of our economy and if we cannot ensure their well-being then the cycle of poverty is perpetuated. Please SIGN THE PETITION TO STOP TAXING OUR PERIOD
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    Created by Cecilé-Ann Pearce Picture
  • Water4Syferbult
    Syferbult is a very impoverished community of over a 1000 people living in shacks. About a hundred of the adults get seasonal work, from two to four months of the year; the rest make do on whatever grants they can access. Despite a contractor putting in taps and pipes that function, fgor years the community has received slightly erratic tanker water. In September, they received nothing for three full weeks. Since then they have received approximately four tankers (enough for drinking water for four days) and the water has run in the taps twice for about 45 minutes (without any warning or notification). The councillor for Ward 36 claims this is because they owe Eskom R6000; I've also been told the water can't be pumped because of: cable theft; problems with the diesel generator; a circuit breaker malfunctioning; and the township has not been formalised (if so, why was infrastucture contracted and put in place?) On 18 October, the thirsty, dusty and dirty community finally exploded and marched in protest. They were met with rubber bullets and tear gas - one person was injured, thankfully not seriously. And still the children, the sick, the elderly are thirsty - so thirsty that when we arrive with bakkie-loads of water, they run and jump on the back of the moving vehicle, unable to hold back, desperate for the precious fluid. This is unconstitutional. "The right of access to sufficient water is accorded to everyone in s 27(1)(b) of the Constitution, which states that everyone has the right to have access to sufficient water. Section 27(2) requires the State to take reasonable legislative and other measures, within its available resources, to achieve the progressive realisation of the right." Syferbult is not alone in this plight. I have heard of at least six other communities in Rustenburg area with the same problem. Yet phoning, emailing, attending meetings , buttonholing the councillor.... nothing works. Please spread this far and wide.
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    Created by Mandi Smallhorne
  • Respect Customary Marriages In South Africa
    MEDIA RELEASE: New date agreed by the parties in the recognition of Muslim marriages class action Today, Monday 20 March 2017, the before Human Rights Day, a new date was agreed by the parties concerned for the recognition of Muslim marriages class action to heard by the High Court. The 28th August has been agreed. A directions hearing was convened by the High Court this morning after the Judge President ordered the consolidation of a further matter pending before the High Court which similarly highlights the plight of Muslim women. There are several matters that are pending at a number of courts across the country. This is testament to the fact that Muslim women are struggling to assert their rights because their Muslim marriages and the consequences arising therefrom are not legally recognised. They have no option but to plead their cases with the courts and the judiciary. Given the importance of the matter three judges have now been appointed to hear the matter. Namely; Judges S Desai, G Salie-Hlophe and NP Boqwana. This morning saw women come to the steps of the High Court from all over Cape Town to show solidarity and support for this matter. The lived reality of these women is that legal protection has been denied to them some 16 years after the Constitution came into force. This results in widespread oppression and gender discrimination in areas such as divorce, the duties of support, parental rights and responsibilities and inheritance. Press Release On Other Case Outcomes: http://www.wlce.co.za/images/press%20releases/WLC_Customary%20Marriages%20Act_Limpop%20ruling_020816%20press%20release.pdf Article: Are nikah and sindoor equal to wedding rings and lobola?: http://www.standup.co.za/bambanani-social-justice/resources/63-wlc-customary-marriages-case.html Also Read: http://www.polity.org.za/article/official-customary-law-and-the-disruption-of-patriarchal-power-the-case-of-msinga-2013-09-26
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    Created by Stand UP! Foundation Picture
  • Sign the campaign #DataMustFall
    Researchers who took into account cost of living, have found that South Africa has the second most expensive data costs among BRICS countries [1]. Previously as reported by IOL, many have claimed that Mzansi’s data costs are the highest in the world: 1GB (gigabyte) of data costs R150 in Mzansi, compared to R11 in India, R22 in Nigeria and R23 in Namibia [2]. However, this comparison is not adjusted for cost of living, so in order to compare apples with apples. Indra de Lanerolle, an expert whose research concerns Internet access, use and development and the Internet's social, political and economic effects, in South Africa and the continent, agrees with the call for a 50% cut on data costs when he asserts, "On three major networks (which account for more than 95% of all mobile customers) 500MB – the amount of data they set as a minimum – of data costs between R85 and R105. So for the average South African 500MB per month is unaffordable. In fact mobile data prices would have to fall by about half to be affordable." [3] The digital divide excludes the majority of people in South Africa from accessing information and news, applying for jobs, accessing education resources online and keeping in touch with family and friends. High data costs perpetuate inequality. The internet must be democratised now! The nature of South Africa’s economy forces many to leave their loved ones to find work in urban areas, but lowering the cost of data will allow people to call, share pictures and videos with loved ones back home. Without access to data, most of us as the members of amandla. mobi would not even be able connect and fight for social justice, let alone know what is going on in our country given the SABC censoring news lately. [1] http://www.fin24.com/Tech/Multimedia/data-prices-how-sa-compares-to-the-rest-of-the-world-20160930 [2] http://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/datamustfall-cut-costs-or-else-icasa-warns-2072293 [3] https://theconversation.com/internet-freedom-why-access-is-becoming-a-human-right-59125
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    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Stop drugs trade in Rosettenville, JHB-South
    We see everyday the dangers of drugs and the ripple effect they have on our already deteriorating psycho-socio-economic conditions. If we do not do anything about it, it will only get worse. The future of our beloved country lies boldly in our kids, very astonishingly. We must fight this war on drugs. This brings me to the most vital and painful truth, "Lelilizwe lizobuswa yizinyoni..."
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    Created by Mandla Masuku
  • Make Gauteng Community Health Workers Permanent
    This issue is important because the health of poor communities, who have no options like private health care, depends on Community Health Workers. In a context of deteriorating health and other social outcomes, the outsourcing of these workers threatens to lead to a further deterioration in the health of township residents. The issue is also important because the Minister is avoiding her constitutional responsibility of providing decent, affordable health care, as well as her constitutional responsibility of fair labour practice.
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    Created by Boipelo Khukhe
  • Stop selling blood jewellery
    Mining companies have been exploiting workers for decades when it has come to workers rights, safety and health. Many workers have died, slow painful deaths with no compensation, having worked in mines that produce gold used by jewellers. Public pressure forced regulation of conflict diamonds, and labelling of goods from Israel, now we need to use consumer power to transform the gold industrial complex.
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    Created by Paul M
  • Pads, bleeding the poor dry!
    Akhona is in grade eight. Like many of her classmates, she often misses school when she has her periods because her family cannot afford sanitary pads [1]. Akhona is not alone. On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [2]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Livity Africa's LiveVIPZA campaign, which initiated the parliament challenge, aims to present a plan in June on how to provide sanitary pads to low income communities to the Health Portfolio Committee. But the implementation requires that the Ministers of Basic Education, Health and Social Development kick start the plan. [1] I use a sock as a sanitary pad, says Langa learner http://www.groundup.org.za/article/i-use-sock-sanitary-pad-says-langa-learner_2418/ [2] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
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    Created by Livity Africa and Pontsho Pilane Picture
  • Reproductive justice now
    Young people were encouraged to register for the upcoming elections, but Noziziwe Buthelezi* won’t be voting in these elections or ever. She died last week after after a failed, unsafe abortion. While abortion is legal in South Africa, women like Noziziwe* are forced to risk their lives by using unsafe, illegal options. The posters advertising these fill our streets, yet most public institutions have no information about the safe, free alternatives available to women. If enough of us come together, we can demand that the National Department of Health (NDOH) upholds women’s right to access quality, affordable and acceptable sexual and reproductive healthcare services, including abortion. *Not her real name
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    Created by The Sexual & Reproductive Justice Coalition Picture
  • Call on Min. of Energy to commit to providing electricity for the families of Soshanguve
    The number of burn victims is raising because of faulty prima stoves that explode. My sister Khensani, was unfortunately one of the victims/survivors in October 2019. She was preparing Sunday lunch for her children when all of a sudden the primus stove that she was using exploded and her face and abdomen caught fire. She was in ICU for weeks and she's still in hospital three months later at Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital. Ever since this incidence we've discovered that she hasn't been the only one to experience this horror. We've met a number of other patients who have burned because of faulty primus stoves. This is a terrible ordeal that no one should ever have to experience, life has been very difficult for the whole family ever since. Khensani has 4 handsome sons who almost lost their mother because of this, Every South African citizen SHOULD have electricity! Primus stoves should be banned.
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    Created by Edith Maluleke
  • Early childhood development
    Children from age 1 to 6 got a very innovative education and my intake of children in 1 year is the proof that We provided a holistic education .
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    Created by Nisha Singh