• Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in [put the name of your municipality here]
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide. * This campaign by amandla.mobi is supported by Heinrich Böll Stiftung.
    6 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Vusi Sodiye
  • City of Tshwane Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan
    On the 9th November 2016, Tshwane, Joburg and Ekurhuleni were hit by severe flash floods where 6 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that Municipalities are caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management Directorate is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan the Municipality will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
    79 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Ekurhuleni Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan.
    On the 9th November 2016, Germiston, Johannesburg and Tshwane were hit by severe flash floods where 4 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that our Municipality is caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management Directorate within Minucipalities is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan Municipalities will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
    56 of 100 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • City of Joburg Municipality - Make public your disaster management funds and plan.
    On the 9th November 2016, Joburg, Tshwane and Ekurhuleni were hit by severe flash floods where 6 lives (and counting) were lost. Cars were submerged under water due to poor drainage systems that saw our roads fill up and sweeping cars and causing mayhem and death. This despite warnings by the Weather services of La nino much earlier on in the year [1]. In a recent speech at the Disaster Management Institute of Southern Africa Conference in September, Minister of Cooperative Governance Mr Dez Van Rooyen stressed the importance of incorporating Disaster Management into Municipal Intergrated Development Plan (IDP) to ensure disaster risk reduction [2]. In recent months, we witnessed the life of little Angela Sibanda being snatched from her by heavy floods. Her life-less body swept down a river while she was attempting to cross to get to school. The Joburg Municipality still has not erected a bridge to this day, perhaps they are still waiting for more lives to be lost. We also know that most squatter-camps where the poorest live, are built in low lying areas that pose a risk especially when there are flash floods i.e the banks of Jukskei. It cannot be that our Municipality is caught off-guard when disaster strikes. "One of the core functions of Disaster Management and PIER Directorate is to ensure that departments have contingency plans and are ready to respond pro-actively,to any hazards that happen in their departments rather than react." What is the point of a contingency plan if citizens are not warned and prepared in time? Must lives be lost first before the Municipality implements this grand plan? By making public the Disaster Management plan the Municipality will not only allay fears but will ensure that all citizenry they service is informed and prepared when disaster strikes. [1] http://city-press.news24.com/Business/weak-la-nina-a-fillip-for-sa-20160610 [2] http://www.ndmc.gov.za/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mSxdxgDEDuA%3d&tabid=39&mid=611
    216 of 300 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Take Skhumba Hlope off air until he apologises
    Amidst the violence at Wits University, Sarah Mokwebo, Hlengiwe Patricia Ndlovu and Lerato Motaung stripped during the protest at the main campus saying they were tired of being brutalised. The three women‚ faced the police with their hands crossed over their heads in an effort to stop the violence. Skhumba Hlope thereafter uploaded a video of himself body shaming the three women, making reference to "droopy breasts" also making fun of their stretch marks and bellies. While we completely support freedom of expression, Skhumba's comments are part of institutionalising the policing of women's bodies and reinforcing the idea that they exist for public consumption. By taking him off air until he publicly apologises, Kaya FM will be sending a firm signal to us all that the station does not endorse such views.
    8,264 of 9,000 Signatures
    Created by Koketso Moeti
  • Sign the campaign #DataMustFall
    Researchers who took into account cost of living, have found that South Africa has the second most expensive data costs among BRICS countries [1]. Previously as reported by IOL, many have claimed that Mzansi’s data costs are the highest in the world: 1GB (gigabyte) of data costs R150 in Mzansi, compared to R11 in India, R22 in Nigeria and R23 in Namibia [2]. However, this comparison is not adjusted for cost of living, so in order to compare apples with apples. Indra de Lanerolle, an expert whose research concerns Internet access, use and development and the Internet's social, political and economic effects, in South Africa and the continent, agrees with the call for a 50% cut on data costs when he asserts, "On three major networks (which account for more than 95% of all mobile customers) 500MB – the amount of data they set as a minimum – of data costs between R85 and R105. So for the average South African 500MB per month is unaffordable. In fact mobile data prices would have to fall by about half to be affordable." [3] The digital divide excludes the majority of people in South Africa from accessing information and news, applying for jobs, accessing education resources online and keeping in touch with family and friends. High data costs perpetuate inequality. The internet must be democratised now! The nature of South Africa’s economy forces many to leave their loved ones to find work in urban areas, but lowering the cost of data will allow people to call, share pictures and videos with loved ones back home. Without access to data, most of us as the members of amandla. mobi would not even be able connect and fight for social justice, let alone know what is going on in our country given the SABC censoring news lately. [1] http://www.fin24.com/Tech/Multimedia/data-prices-how-sa-compares-to-the-rest-of-the-world-20160930 [2] http://www.iol.co.za/news/politics/datamustfall-cut-costs-or-else-icasa-warns-2072293 [3] https://theconversation.com/internet-freedom-why-access-is-becoming-a-human-right-59125
    57,710 of 75,000 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Accountability For Tech Grounds
    The Lenasia Tech Grounds has been left in a terrible state for more than 20 years. In the last few months the City of Johannesburg had issued a tender to support the call by the community to upgrade the facility. Approximately 4.2 million rand was allegedly allocated by the City for this project, on a scope of work not agreed to by any of the stakeholders. The Lenasia Tech Grounds is one of the largest facilities in Johannesburg that caters to sports teams and communities in the South of Johannesburg. The facility caters to the needs from areas such as Soweto, Lenasia, Lehae, Thembilihle, Lenasia South, Lawley, Ennerdale, Orange Farm and Eldorado Park. Thousands of young and old continue to use this facility but with growing neglect many have stopped playing sport and/or have moved on to other clubs in far more privileged areas. Draining local talent and make it difficult to sustain on going sports programs. "Sport has the power to change the world. It has the power to inspire. It has the power to unite people that little else does. Sport can create hope where once there was only despair"- Nelson Mandela. Unfortunately this continued neglect of the facility further entrenches the divide between communities and has only left us with despair and hopelessness. “Gauteng Cricket Board CEO Gregory Fredericks made a statement that illustrated the stark reality facing suburbs and areas associated with the Group Areas Act movement during Apartheid. After highlighting that cricket, unlike other sporting codes, requires facilities and fields that are different in that it is played over longer durations, and associated infrastructure should in fact cater to those requirements, he made explicit the point about how dehumanising it is to have clubs in the province that compete at various levels, with no access to basic amenities throughout the day. This point can be clearly understood when seen through the lens of the Tech facility In Lenasia. A spread of 8 fields, with a single built structure of toilets that are not properly maintained and have minimal functionality remain the central feature of this facility. This council facility is shared by cricketers and soccer players alike, and this in no way assists either sporting code.” (Mangera, A, Sport as a Catalyst for Community and Social Development, 2017) We, the concerned residents of the Lenasia and Thembilihle area, sports bodies, cultural groups and organisations from in and around Lenasia who make use of the facility regularly, civil society and religious bodies, are calling for accountability from the Mayor, the MMC, and all department heads responsible for this project by the City of Johannesburg. This facility caters to thousands of people from all over the region and yet no clear scope of work had been given to the relevant stakeholders and to date all the work done at the facility does not account or reflect the expenditure of the tax payer’s money. We require immediate intervention and assessment into this matter to ensure all funds can be accounted for and spent on the development of the facility. With high levels of corruption rampant within all spheres of government we demand accountability and transparency. Monies spent from the public purse must be spent in its full extent to the development of our communities and not for profiteering tenderprenuers and corrupt officials. Either money was not spent, the tender was overpriced or there was a lack of oversight and monitoring done by the city on the services provided. Our country is in dire need of ethical leadership and we hope that those responsible will take harsh measures for any wrongdoing found in the above mentioned issue. What has happened to Lenasia's Sporting Facility funds? https://soundcloud.com/radioislam/what-has-happened-to-lenasias-sporting-facility-funds https://risingsunlenasia.co.za/53264/lenasia-sports-fraternity-arms-sports-facility/ Video Call to Action: https://wp.me/p8PLB1-1w
    944 of 1,000 Signatures
    Created by Irfaan Mangera Picture
  • Stop food related illnesses: Food safety for all
    Between late 2017 and early 2018 our country went down in history for the biggest listeria outbreak in history, affecting over 1000 people and killing almost 300. Many families were robbed of their loved ones by the very thing they work to put on their table- food. Thousands of lives were affected by the decisions of a group of individuals employed by the biggest and most indispensable industry in the universe, its all good and well that the perpetrators are being held accountable for their actions and it is also commendable that they are cooperative and willing to attempt to compensate for the damage caused (though 300 fold irreversible)- my issue is not about corrective action, its in preventative action, the listeria outbreak should have opened our eyes to the fact that the giant that is our food industry is not indestructible, in fact in as much as the industry is one of our greatest assets, it can easily turn into our biggest serial killer, with unsuspecting civilians as its prey and deadly bacteria as its modus operandi- we need to implement not only corrective action but preventative action as well, surely we can't wait until another outbreak or more lives lost before we educate society that listeria is not the only food-related pathogen? That there are a handful of other deadly germs that are waiting for ideal conditions to pounce. I think Africa has always placed so much focus on food availability and food security and I feel that not enough emphasis has been placed on what we should look out for when we finally get our hands on food. We need to educate the general public on what to look out for, how to prepare and store food safely, what to do when they suspect food is unsafe etc to help prevent another negative world record again.
    13 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Lydia Shoniwa-Sagonda