• #NotInOurNameUCT
    UCT management has made it clear that they plan to resume full university functions on Monday 3rd October through the use of extensive private security. Heavy private security has been deployed at other South African universities with serious implications for the safety of students and staff alike. The state’s recent zero tolerance directive to the police force with regard to student protesters shows an increased willingness to use violence to resolve disputes. However there is no strong evidence that increased security will protect students or prevent the destruction of property. In fact experiences over the last year and on other campuses have shown increased security presence escalates tensions and is more likely to lead to violence than to mitigate it. Despite management’s multiple communiques regarding engagements with different stakeholders, a transparent negotiation process between management and protesting students only began in earnest as of this Friday, 30th September. Without a genuine commitment to engaging with tangible outcomes, there is substantial basis to concerns that the opening of campus on Monday 3rd October will dissolve the urgency to deal with issues of fees, interdicts and institutional culture. #NotInOurNameUCT #DenouncePrivateSecurity #EndTheImpasse Ways to show support: We ask that people sign and share the petition in support. For tutor groups, teaching or lab assistants and other students or staff involved in the running of the university, you could send emails to your students and faculties (to denounce use of private security, declare a stay-away or discontinuation of work until these issues are addressed, and pressure your faculty bodies to take a stance on this matter) For different interest groups at UCT, whether student societies or faculty bodies or other, public statements denouncing private security and calling for engagement.
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    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • STOP SECURITISATION OF OUR CAMPUSES!
    Although there may be wide and reasonable disagreements with respect to both the goals and tactics of the student movement for free, quality and decolonised education, as well as the goals and tactics of university managements, the securitisation of campuses can never be an effective way of resolving differences. Such securitisation can and has already has caused bodily harm and trauma to protestors, by-standers, academics, support staff and security personnel themselves, while further exacerbating fear and mistrust, thereby polarising positions and undermining academic freedom. It is unreasonable and unsafe to expect students, academic staff and support staff to continue the academic project under these conditions. Moreover, it is antithetical to the pursuit of a negotiated solution that will enable the completion of the academic year successfully. Academics and concerned persons, please sign the petition with your name and affiliation.
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    Created by amandla.mobi member Picture
  • Petition to address the list of demands of SFMFDefiance
    This is in accordance with FREE decolonized education.
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    Created by Thato Malema
  • Respect Customary Marriages In South Africa
    MEDIA RELEASE: New date agreed by the parties in the recognition of Muslim marriages class action Today, Monday 20 March 2017, the before Human Rights Day, a new date was agreed by the parties concerned for the recognition of Muslim marriages class action to heard by the High Court. The 28th August has been agreed. A directions hearing was convened by the High Court this morning after the Judge President ordered the consolidation of a further matter pending before the High Court which similarly highlights the plight of Muslim women. There are several matters that are pending at a number of courts across the country. This is testament to the fact that Muslim women are struggling to assert their rights because their Muslim marriages and the consequences arising therefrom are not legally recognised. They have no option but to plead their cases with the courts and the judiciary. Given the importance of the matter three judges have now been appointed to hear the matter. Namely; Judges S Desai, G Salie-Hlophe and NP Boqwana. This morning saw women come to the steps of the High Court from all over Cape Town to show solidarity and support for this matter. The lived reality of these women is that legal protection has been denied to them some 16 years after the Constitution came into force. This results in widespread oppression and gender discrimination in areas such as divorce, the duties of support, parental rights and responsibilities and inheritance. Press Release On Other Case Outcomes: http://www.wlce.co.za/images/press%20releases/WLC_Customary%20Marriages%20Act_Limpop%20ruling_020816%20press%20release.pdf Article: Are nikah and sindoor equal to wedding rings and lobola?: http://www.standup.co.za/bambanani-social-justice/resources/63-wlc-customary-marriages-case.html Also Read: http://www.polity.org.za/article/official-customary-law-and-the-disruption-of-patriarchal-power-the-case-of-msinga-2013-09-26
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    Created by Stand UP! Foundation Picture
  • 24hrs left to add your name! Release the Norms and Standards Progress Reports
    After a concerted struggle by learners, parents, teachers and community members across the country, the Minister of Basic Education released Minimum Norms and Standards for School Infrastructure in late 2013. These provide a blueprint for what makes a school a school, by defining the basic infrastructure every school needs, and setting out deadlines for when this must be provided. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEjsm7K8cRg The first deadline is on 29 November 2016. By this time: - All schools made of mud, asbestos, metal or wood must be replaced by new schools. - Schools with no water, electricity or sanitation must be provided with these. In our work, we continue to encounter schools without these basics. It's clear that the Norms and Standards will not be met: by the Department of Basic Education's (DBE) own statistics, as of June 2016, 171 schools have no water supply, 569 schools have no electricity, and 68 schools have no toilets. The public deserves to know what has, and has not, been done to implement the Norms. The DBE must be held accountable! This is why we need the progress reports. Norms and Standards have the power to change education in South Africa. But they are not perfect - they have loopholes which make it difficult for communities to hold the DBE accountable. Equal Education has asked the Minister to fix these problems for two years, but she has not listened. So, we are taking her to court. But it doesn't need to be like this. The Minister has the power to review and amend Norms and Standards. She must fix the loopholes.
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    Created by Equal Education Picture
  • A Call to the SACS Schools Governing Body for Transformation
    The importance of this petition cannot be understated and is paramount to the future of the educational landscape of South Africa. A prosperous future for our nation requires those at the greatest disadvantage to be provided with access to the best schools and the best opportunities to succeed. Former Model-C schools are, by and large, public institutions and as such should act in the public interest rather than the interests of the economic elite.
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    Created by Old Boys for Transformation
  • Fix Our Schools' Code of Conduct
    Over the last few weeks, we have heard of Black learners at different schools across Mzansi being subjected to having swimming caps put over their heads to determine whether their hair is "neat"; receiving demerits for speaking in their native languages and being told their natural hair is "untidy". This is a result of both the abuse of process in the form of code of conducts to discriminate and exclude, as well as the arbitrary implementation of these codes. This is happening despite the fact that the South African government has guidelines for the consideration of School Governing Bodies (SGBs) when developing code of conducts. You see the South African Schools Act states the "main focus of the Code of Conduct must be positive discipline; it must not be punitive and punishment oriented but facilitate constructive learning" and that it is done in consultation with "parents, learners, educators, and non-educators at that school" [1]. This is to ensure that process includes as many stakeholders as possible, including the learners who will be required to adhere to the code of conduct. Also to ensure that it is not used to discriminate and exclude, both through its content and arbitrary implementation, but rather contribute towards learning and development. Our education system, like many other South African systems, continues to suffer from colonial hangovers perpetuated by those who want to continue to use our schools as a means of maintaining the status quo. As learners from different parts of the country demand an end to this, lets stand in solidarity with them and make sure that our leaders know this is a key issue, and we won't stop until they ensure that the schools in their respective provinces adhere to these guidelines. [1] http://www.gov.za/sites/www.gov.za/files/18900.pdf
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  • End financial exclusion of students at TUT
    Without the qualification one studies for many doors remain inaccessible to the students who cannot afford to settle account while they have academically qualified to graduate. If the purpose of our nations creation was meant to usher in an age where social caveats become meaningless & society is developed by empowering those who were previously left out of the development of their fatherland then surely denying access to someone whose single mother might have been able to pay their fees but falls short because of the death or insolvency of a parent or guardian; should that person continue to live in the shadow of poverty accepting any menial work while depriving the nation of an educated and industrious talent? Surely our nation can do better by a youth who offers so much promise for tomorrow; and surely a youth whose only solemn plea to its government and institutions of higher learning remains steadfast and sincere in the acquisition of education which is meant to benefit the entire society regardless of race, class, gender, religion, sexual orientation or whatever artificial social constructs that stop us from looking at people as they are; people. The promises made to the parents of my generation are now long overdue; our youth need their society to raise them up because without our youth in a position towards social mobility the continued degeneration of our nation is a gurantee. Economic apartheid needs to be abolished so that no more African children have to feel outcasts in the land of their birth based only on the commas and numbers on their academic records instead of the fortitude of the discipline it took to achieve these qualifications amidst strenuous circumstances. We can no longer turn our backs on the vulnerable members of our society and expect them to fend for themselves and then wonder why crime, murder, drug abuse and the like continue to adversely affect SA's youth. The time for change is NOW!
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    Created by Sbu Karim Napaai
  • Stop Racism at Pretoria Girls High
    Right now, learners at Pretoria High school are demanding that racist practices at the school are brought to an end. Girls attending the school have been forced to straighten their hair; are accused of conspiring when standing in groups and face other intolerable comments and actions. We stand in solidarity with the learners, who marched at the school on the 26th to say enough is enough. It is unacceptable that in a country in which Black people are a demographic majority, we still today continue to be expected to pander to whiteness and to have it enforced through school policy. Black children should be allowed to just be children, without being burdened with having to assert their humanity.
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    Created by Koketso Moeti
  • Save Funda Community College
    Funda Community College was founded 30 years ago by Professor Eskia Mphahlele. This erstwhile prestigious institution housed a number of organisations which formed part of an Education Cooperative at the time. These organisations were: The Council for Black Education and Research, the Community Development Projects Association, the African Institute of Art, the Madimba Institute of African Music, the Soyikwa Institute of African Theater, and the Part-Time University Students Association. These organisations collectively made Funda Centre to become a critical institution that brought about transformation in education and played an important role in the development of the Arts in Black communities of Soweto and other surrounding townships like Sebokeng, Sharpeville, Alexandra, Katlehong, Mamelodi etc.
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    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Stop drugs trade in Rosettenville, JHB-South
    We see everyday the dangers of drugs and the ripple effect they have on our already deteriorating psycho-socio-economic conditions. If we do not do anything about it, it will only get worse. The future of our beloved country lies boldly in our kids, very astonishingly. We must fight this war on drugs. This brings me to the most vital and painful truth, "Lelilizwe lizobuswa yizinyoni..."
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    Created by Mandla Masuku
  • CPUT TRC
    Repeat of 1976. 1. Students suspensions 2. Pending Court Cases 3. Workers and Staff victimisation 4. Constitution of the Country Violation ( Convicted with no trial) 5. Praising of Apartheid methods and Tactics
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    Created by Sapho Allan