• Protect Customary Land Rights
    The Constitution recognises the informal or customary rights of people living in the former homelands yet the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform has failed to legislate a communal land rights law that will strengthen and protect these rights. As a result; * Big cooperates are grabbing land in the communal land without any compensation for loss citing development. * Nature of individuals and family rights within a broader community are not clarified, and overshadowed by majority in the community. * People are not adequately compensated when land is sold or awarded for big developments * Consultation and Consent of land occupiers is not respected because of the weak nature of the rights provided by current law. In 1996, Parliament passed the Interim Protection of Informal Land Rights Act (IPILRA) to provide protection for all people living on communal land in the former Bantustans, people living on trust land, people who previously had Permissions to Occupy (PTOs) and anyone living on land uninterrupted since 1997 “as if they were the owner”. This was a big milestone in the protection and recognition of customary land rights and the empowerment of families to be part of bargaining and negotiations of any socio-economic development happening in their land. Although people are protected by IPILRA, the fact that it is temporary and can be renewed annually, deprives people of their rights to say NO to development that disadvantages them. This makes it easy for "developers" or Government to easily expropriate the land. It is also worth noting that the law also states that the Minister of Rural Development and Land Reform can make regulations in terms of IPILRA to provide more detailed processes and procedures.
    83 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Alliance for Rural Democracy
  • Stop the Traditional Leadership and Khoisan Bill as it currently stands.
    Any law that seeks to facilitate recognition of previously marginalised group or any development of land belonging to the people must ensure that community consultation and consent is at the centre. The TKLB closes down that space and excludes ordinary people from being consulted and give consent on decisions that will affect their lives. There needs to be meaningful public participation. As it stands, the TKLB only highlights consultations with high profile structures such as the House of Traditional Leaders, royal families and traditional councils and there is no mention of rural citizens who are land buyers and customary land rights users. The TKLB supports rural elites' access to wealth and resources. It does not put in place mechanisms that holds leaders accountable to their people. The discovery of mineral wealth in the land that was once considered dry and not productive has brought about disputes where people’s peace is disrupted by big mining companies, and when people react they are suppressed and criminalized.
    26 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Alliance for Rural Democracy
  • Revoke Enviroserv Shongweni Landfill Licence
    Enviroserv has been in the news a lot lately for their toxic waste landfill site, which has angered the residents of Shongweni. But Enviroserv’s crimes are not only limited to those in the current new cycle. They have been polluting in black communities, such as Ntshongweni, Dassenhoek, KwaNdengezi, Buxfarm and Cliffdale, for over 15 years and have left struggling communities with a mountain of health issues including; headaches, fatigue and nose bleeds. There is has been no science-specific research that measures the long term impacts of Enviroserv’s pollution and the health issues experienced by communities. A targeted surveillance system that maps out the social, health and environmental impacts created by hazardous waste needs to be developed to avoid far more serious health issues like cancer in the future. Enviroserv’s legal appeal process that is challenging DEA’s decision to suspend their operations license, sends a clear message that Enviroserv thinks our lives are cheap and that profit matters more to them then our health, environment and quality of life. EnviroServ is ignoring our constitutional rights and the increased incidence of illnesses apparently related to the foul odour, not to mention the psychological effects living in the stench of a toxic landfill is having on us. By refusing to tell us what is going into the landfill and what its possible toxic effects on humans are, you are only serving to increase our fear that the health effects are being caused by the hazardous, ineffectively or untreated waste being accepted at the landfill.
    30 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Stop forced evictions of communities in Amadiba!
    SANRAL is pursuing the construction of a new toll road highway through the Wild Coast region of the Eastern Cape – a road that would have potentially disastrous effects on local communities and the environment. The proposed new toll will dissect the ancestral lands of the people of Amadiba Traditional Authority, the majority of whom are strongly opposed to its construction, and would rather prefer improvement to the existing network of roads upon which existing towns and villages rely. About 40 families, a number of schools and grave-sites under the Amadiba Traditional Authority alone will be relocated from their land if SANRAL goes ahead with the N2 Toll construction they are planning. It will be the second time some of these communities being moved. First it was to make way for Sun international to build a holiday resort in the 80’s under the then Homeland government. Now in the new dispensation, under democratic rule, they are again pressured to move and are not even consulted on it [1]. Vusi Mona, the spokesperson for SANRAL said work on the project would go ahead as planned unless government said otherwise [2]. This blatant disregard for community concerns is alarming.What of the much touted Batho-Pele principles? Why is our government unsympathetic to the cries of the people? Why do they continue putting profits before people? This imposed toll road and mining projects are leaving those whose lives will be directly affected unable to assert their democratic rights to participate effectively in the decision-making processes that impact on their lives, or to protect themselves against the powerful political and corporate greed that wish to exploit their resources. [1] Community members and organisations explain why they don't want titanium mining in Xolobeni. Amadiba Crisis Committee, Xolani Ntuli & Others. 12 August 2013. [2] Xolobeni villagers are "tired of being abused". By Lubabalo Ngcukana, 16 April 2017
    200 of 300 Signatures
  • SA Says NO to Monsanto's bogus drought tolerant GMO maize and toxic glyphosate
    We are deeply troubled by the continuous introduction of risky GMOs into our food and farming systems. Since its introduction into our food system in 1998, it has done nothing to address our nation’s hunger problems. Instead, we are left with polluted soil and water and loss of our superior, local farmer-bred varieties of maize. We are also extremely concerned about the political economy of seed control that Monsanto has imposed on our seed system, which utterly undermines our food sovereignty and breeds a dependency on Monsanto's industrial systems and technologies. Local land belonging to smallholder farmers in SA have already been contaminated. More GMOs will only exacerbate this situation and further erode farmers’ seed systems. We call on our government to reject Monsanto’s application and begin a real dialogue with South Africans to transition out of industrial and GM-based agriculture systems and work towards real climate resilient solutions that are ecologically sustainable, socially just and takes care of the nutritional needs of all South Africans
    23,627 of 25,000 Signatures
    Created by African Centre for Biodiversity Picture
  • Secure and rehabilitate disused mines
    Mining communities' lives are in danger. Recently a young boy, Richard, aged 5 fell inside an neglected, uncovered mine shaft and has not been found since[1]. His mother has been crying since the accident, all she wants is her child's body. South Africa’s Department of Mineral Resources, holds a list of 6,000 "derelict and ownerless" mines, which became the government’s problem over the years when the former owners disappeared. The Department of Mineral Resources must work very closely with the Department of Environmental Affairs before awarding closure certificates to these mining companies. Rehabilitation plans ought to be submitted and approved by the authorities before any mining activity can start, and that finances must be set aside for this purpose. However, it looks like this is not happening and some mining houses close down and leave the state to foot the bill for the clean-up costs. We know that communities who live in these areas are predominantly Black and of low income households. The former apartheid government placed many settlements near or even on top of the mining waste dumps but this does not mean that their lives are not valuable. It is upon all of us as Mzansi citizens to put pressure on these Departments to hold these mining companies accountable by vigorously enforcing the NEMA (National Environmental Management Act) from the initial prospecting phase to the closure of mine operations. [1] http://www.news24.com/Video/SouthAfrica/News/all-i-want-is-my-child-desperate-plea-from-mother-of-boy-5-who-fell-down-mine-shaft-20170228
    300 of 400 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Hire a graduate, even if they don't have experience
    We can't get jobs because we lack experience, we are suffering.
    1,201 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Phumelele Hlongwane
  • Declare OR TAMBO hailstorm affected areas as distaster areas
    On Monday the 2nd of January 2017, a number of areas including the Qweqwe, Payne, Zimbane, Maqhinebeni, VIdgiesville, Mqanduli and the surrounding areas were hit by a severe hailstorm which left many desitute and homeless [1]. Homes, schools and churches were severely damaged and a number of people were rushed to hospital with injuries. During this time of the year this kind of weather uis expected and it is deeply worrying that everytime our Municipality is caught off guard with no contingency plan. We know that it is norm for Disaster Management to delay responding to these disasters even though they have a set budget for such. This is evident even in this case, there has not been any statement issued to declare or any information to give guidance to the affected communities like a toll free number or contact offices/persons We however, commend the Department of Health for being visible and issuing a media statement going as far as offering assistance to those injured. [1] Lightining strikes Seven people in Mthatha, Jenni Evans, News24
    196 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Fungiwe Ntleki
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in [put the name of your municipality here]
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide. * This campaign by amandla.mobi is supported by Heinrich Böll Stiftung.
    10 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Vusi Sodiye
  • Stop being secretive about the Nuclear power deal.
    The secrecy around Mzansi's Nuclear power plan, leaves much to be desired. It does not allow for those it will impact on to make an informed choice on whether they approve of it or not. It should concern all of us that the Department of Energy has failed its responsibility to provide the public with all the relevant information needed to make appropriate energy choices, with enough time to consider all the options available. Nuclear energy is much more expensive than solar and wind. The amount of money that will be invested if the nuclear deal goes ahead means that our country could well and truly become bankrupt. To build a nuclear plant optimistically takes 10 years and often much longer[1]. Is it fair to keep our people who do not have electricity access waiting for another decade/ CSIR and other scientific bodies suggest that this nuclear deal will be a disaster and will not create jobs as being promised similar to how the arms deal promised jobs but did not deliver. Instead a handful of politically connected people got rich at the expense of the poor. For starters, investing in renewable energy could deliver many more jobs than nuclear will be good for job creation as well as generating energy safely, cleanly and cheaply but this seems not to be considered and opens the energy space for much plundering. So in summary the nuclear deal is too expensive, too dangerous and will deliver too little too late to address the absence of electricity provision. The poor in our country are being betrayed by a deal at best will only benefit the needs of a few industries and at worst only benefiting those that stand to make money out of this deal. Nuclear energy is going to affect us and the future generations. We must get involved now before its too late. [1] http://mg.co.za/article/2015-11-05-why-south-africa-should-not-build-eight-new-nuclear-power-stations
    2,721 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by amandla. mobi member
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in Govan Mbeki Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide. * This campaign by amandla.mobi is supported by Heinrich Böll Stiftung.
    100 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Thulile Motha
  • Fight corruption, demand transparent service delivery in AbaQulusi Municipality
    We can improve service delivery and fight corruption in our Municipality by ensuring all Service Delivery Agreements (SDAs) are public and easily accessible to all. Some politicians, officials and businesses are scared about transparency, but if they aren't doing anything wrong, what have they got to hide.
    2 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Phumlani Mangethe