• Provide basic services to informal settlements
    “When we think about using the toilet, we feel dirty. We feel like we don’t have human dignity, but we have nowhere else to live, so we just have to make the best of it. This is why we are building our own toilets.” Margret Mabene, Mzondi resident. Just recently, reports surfaced that people living in Mzondi informal settlement, Ivory Park, had started a crowdfund so that they could build toilets [1]. This desperation exists across many informal settlements that are scattered across South Africa's cities. Despite this, many people living in informal settlements are overlooked in service provision. There is a growing demand for living space around cities, and South Africa has housing backlogs. People living in informal settlements have rights. The need to grant them access to water and sanitation is a human rights issue. South Africa has the laws that force municipalities to provide basic services. Abahlali BaseMjondolo, in their Harry Gwala court case against the City of Ekurhuleni, are a good example of how people living in informal settlements have used the law to defend their rights. In this case, the people successfully argued that Ekurhuleni had a statutory obligation in terms of the Water Services Act, which requires a safe albeit temporary toilet for each stand, including in informal settlements [2]. It is important for ordinary South Africans to stand in solidarity with those who are marginalised. This is important for the advancement of justice and equity, ideals that are enshried in our Constitution. People living in informal settlements deserve dignity, like all human beings, irrespective of their material condition. [1] Community tries crowd funding to get toilets, Zoe Postman for GroundUp News. March 13, 2018. [2] The right to basic services in informal settlements: Notes on Harry Gwala High Court hearing 12 December 2008, Abahlali BaseMjondolo. Dec 15, 2008.
    3 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Tell DUT to pay workers decent living wages and end the strike
    DUT staff moral is at its lowest because of the failure by management and the council to resolve this matter in a timely and respectful manner. Staff also deserve a decent salary for their living, it is a violation of their rights when they are ignored by the Vice Chancellor, management and the Council as well. This frustrates staff, and as a result they are withholding their labour and the whole university is badly affected. We want our kids to study and we want staff that will attend to our student needs in a manner that truly affirms that DUT is a student centred university of which right now is not the case. The strike is affecting students in so many ways. One of the students, Sphamandla Gumede, when interviewed by Independent News said, "it makes me very angry. At home they don’t understand why we haven’t started studying. They are thinking I am coming to university to just waste money." https://www.iol.co.za/dailynews/dut-strike-leaves-students-despondent-13300671
    1,932 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Nomvula Maneli Picture
  • Decriminalise sex work now! Don’t let this moment pass
    Sex work is work, and right now sex workers are calling for solidarity to keep them safe by supporting the call for the full decriminalisation of adult sex work. Some in Parliament support this call and if enough of us make public submissions before the 26th February 2018, we could change the lives of sex workers. Like many other people, Nosipho uses her profession to support herself and her family, to further her studies, to save up for her future and to gain financial freedom and security [1]. But because sex work is criminalised in Mzansi, she and many others, face unsafe working conditions where they face corrupt police who want bribes or rape sex workers in exchange for not being arrested. https://www.youtube.com/embed/dg4l3X9rJHw?ecver=1 This video explains the 4 possible legal models for sex work and why South African sex workers want the full decriminalisation of sex work. Despite the overwhelming evidence showing the ongoing harm caused by criminalisation, the much anticipated sex work report by the South African Law Reform Commission (SALRC) recommends that sex work remains a criminal offence [2]. Now, for the first time in decades, there's a real chance for change. Sex workers and women’s rights groups, like SWEAT and Sisonke, have loudly condemned the report. Parliament's Multi-Party Women's Caucus noted the flaws of the report [3] and the chairperson of the Caucus stressing that the full decriminalisation of sex work is the only model that respects the rights of sex workers [4]. In just a few days, the Women’s Caucus could help determine what the future looks like for people like Nosipho. If we don’t speak out against this horrendous report sex workers may be sent back into danger. There’s only a few days left to make submissions responding to the report. Make sure to send yours through by the 26th February 2018. [1], I am a sex worker: criminalising my work puts me in danger, Nosipho Vidima for GroundUp News, June 14, 2017. [2] Parliament's women's caucus to host sex work summit, Jeanette Chabalala for News24. Feb 9, 2018. [3] Sex work report on prostitution rejected, Nicola Daniels for Independent News. May 30, 2017. [4] Multi-Party Women's Caucus disappointed about law reform commission report on adult prostitution, Ms Masefele Story Morutoa. June 1, 2017.
    772 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Deny Katie Hopkins entry into South Africa
    Katie Hopkins is a white supremacist, a bigot and a racist. Not only does she want to come into South Africa to cover a story that has no factual basis, ie that the farm murders are white genocide and ethnic cleansing of white people, she has also sent offensive tweets about our decorated world champion and athlete Caster Semenya. In the same way that Home Affairs denied homophobic Steven Anderson entry last year, we expect the Department to follow suit in denying Katie Hopkins entry. We already have enough racists to deal with from within our borders.
    584 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Stop the demolition of homes in Newcastle
    **UPDATE: The Pietermaritzburg High Court ruled today that the families may not be moved to unstable structures. The Hadebe home in Newcastle, Kwa Zulu Natal will be demolished by Ikhwezi Mining on Friday 15 December 2017. The mine is after the coal in the ground. The Hadebe's and 11 other families were represented by the Department of Land and Rural Affairs who have recently pulled out of the case. The Habede family and its community will be headed to the Pietermaritzburg High Court today, 13 Decemeber 2017, without legal representation. The case will be heard and if the mine wins, these families will spend Christmas in unstable iron structures. https://www.facebook.com/groundWorkSA/posts/2236639909695404
    101 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Stop #RhodesWar on Womxn Activists Now!
    #RhodesWar has been trending since Monday, 11 December, as the public became aware of two female students banned for life from UCKAR because they participated in anti-rape protests in April 2016. The outrageous treatment of student activists at UCKAR who are being systematically excluded and victimized for bringing attention to the failures of management to address the flagrant rape culture on that campus can not be tolerated. We must make sure that womxn activists are not punished for speaking out, taking action and challenging patriarchy in institutions of higher learning and elsewhere. Further this latest attack on student activists represents a wider trend where student leaders are being pushed out of universities for daring to challenge patriarchy, capitalism and calling for decolonised education. These limits placed on hard-won democratic freedoms like the right to protest must be challenged. We must fight for the students who risk everything to fight for us!
    1,410 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Ferron Pedro Picture
  • Help Icasa ensure data only expires after 3 years
    We all hate it when data bundles we have bought, are taken away from us after 30 days, or when our data bundle runs out and the networks don't tell us, so it chows our airtime because we are being charged out of bundle rates. Or the fact that those of us who have the least money can only afford small bundles which expire even faster. For too long companies have made up their own rules and ripped us off. But thanks to our Data Must Fall campaign and other voices, ICASA our regulator has published draft regulations that, if implemented in final form, will prevent networks from expiring users’ data for up to 36 months [1]. The likes of MTN, Vodacom, Cell C and Telkom mobile are furious with Icasa, and are crying poor, but we know the truth, and we can ensure people power supports Icasa's bold moves. Icasa is asking for public comment on their draft regulations, the deadline is the 3rd January. We need to cease the moment, and demonstrate enough public support for these regulations, so that these greedy companies don’t find a way to undermine our campaign demands. We need to build on the momentum gained by the Competition Commission launching an Inquiry into the high price of data. For three years our community has fought for justice in many ways. Today, let’s once again come together to ensure that the Competition Commission acts to ensure that network providers don’t profiteer on the backs of those who can only afford the smallest data bundles. Consumers get discounts for purchasing many other basic goods in bulk and pay premiums for buying in small sachets. One of the underlying reasons for these price differences is that it costs more to package and distribute these goods in small quantities. Data is not a product at all. The costs of supplying data reside largely in the billions of rands of investment in the mobile infrastructure and the cable backbone that supports it. How this cost is distributed amongst consumers is in the hands of the operators. In principle there is no reason why data should not cost the same whether bought in small or large quantities. The only additional cost of providing small bundles for operators rests on the billing and associated communication costs. ICASA should demand that operators justify the costs associated with small bundles. At the moment the ratio between the best value package and the worst on Vodacom for 30 day bundles is 1:20 on MTN is 1:29 on Cell C is 1:40 and on Telkom Mobile is 1:10. While we support Icasa’s move to ensure data bundles only expire after 3 years, we only support this being implemented if ICASA ensures companies don’t then remove smaller data bundles that low-income earners can afford, or remove these bundles altogether. Basically, Icasa while ensuring data bundles don’t expire for 3 years, must ensure this does not come at the cost of low-income consumers.
    1,229 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • STOP LIBYAN SLAVE TRADE!
    This is important because no human being should ever suffer the injustice of being tied down like an animal. We have a responsibility to shield the world's vulnerable peoples. We have a responsibility to stop tyranny in its tracks. The overt racism diaplayed here is deplorable. The fact that all the slaves to be sold are Black African suggests an even more horrible statement. NO TO SLAVERY ! SLAVERY IS AFRICAN HOLOCAUST !
    204 of 300 Signatures
    Created by Mogau Lamola Picture
  • Release the Fees Commission report
    The Minister of Finance is schedule to table the medium-term budget on Wednesday, 25 October 2017. This is an opportune moment for government to announce a favorable stance in response to demands made by Fees Must Fall. The "no-fee varsity" report, which the amandla.mobi community successfully mobilised for it to be made public, set out 12 recommendations showing how free university education for students from low income households can be provided. These recommendations have not yet been implemented. Just last week, President Zuma reshuffled his Cabinet and removed Dr Blade Nzimande as Minister of Higher Education. This is a critical time for the report to be released and to allow all stakeholders to engage with its contents. Join the campaign to demand President Jacob G. Zuma, immediately releases the Fees Commission report to the public.
    399 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Support the #UFSShutdown
    These issues we raise relate to the academic, physical and socio-economic well being of students. The university is mandated to work on achieving these goals. Your support is required to pressure the university to take decisive actions in ensuring it does so. The university must declare no increment, a revised timetable, its support for our cause, the provision of free WiFi and the accreditation of student accommodation. We can no longer allow UFS students to be exposed to these issues.
    1,266 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Tshiamo Malatji Picture
  • Release the 13 persons arrested by the Tanzanian Police
    The arrest in Tanzania last week of 13 people accused of the “promotion of homosexuality” has been called “a terrible human rights violation” [1]. Two of those arrested are from South Africa and include well-known human rights lawyer, Sibongile Ndashe, executive director of the Initiative for Strategic Litigation in Africa (Isla). The arrests took place in Dar es Salaam last Tuesday when the Tanzanian police raided a legal consultation meeting, convened by Isla and Community Health Services and Advocacy (Chesa). "The group was arrested while preparing for a case challenging the Tanzanian government’s decision to ban drop-in centres that served people particularly at risk of contracting HIV. This was according to the National Association of Democratic Lawyers (Nadel), which released a statement at the weekend." [2]. Nadel’s publicity secretary, Memory Sosibo, said the actions by the Tanzanian law- enforcement agencies were a clear attempt to instil fear among those who wished to legally challenge the actions of Tanzania’s government. [1] https://mg.co.za/article/2017-10-22-sa-human-rights-lawyers-arrested-in-tanzania-for-promoting-homosexuality [2] https://www.iol.co.za/capetimes/news/south-africans-detained-in-tanzania-for-promoting-homosexuality-11663994
    793 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Remove Vetus Schola from CPUT
    Although there may be wide and reasonable disagreements with respect to both the goals and tactics of the student movement for free, quality and decolonised education, as well as the goals and tactics of university managements, the securitisation of campuses can never be an effective way of resolving differences. Such securitisation can and has already has caused bodily harm and trauma to protestors, by-standers, academics, support staff and security personnel themselves, while further exacerbating fear and mistrust, thereby polarising positions and undermining academic freedom. It is unreasonable and unsafe to expect students, academic staff and support staff to continue the academic project under these conditions. Moreover, it is antithetical to the pursuit of a negotiated solution that will enable the completion of the academic year successfully. Academics and concerned persons, please sign the petition with your name and affiliation.
    1,436 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member