• STOP THE VICTIMISATION OF STUDENT ACTIVISTS AT UCT
    Over the last year, South Africa has seen a rise in student protests calling for the decolonization of institutions and for the provision of free education. All across the country there has been explosions of student and worker anger directed at university management and the state for their failure to respond adequately to the anti-black, anti-poor and liberal state of our higher education system. Black students and outsourced workers can no longer be silent about their dehumanization in our institutions of higher learning. Black students and outsourced workers can no longer accept being marginalized on their own land. However, university executives across the country are silently using their institutional powers to stifle dissent by victimizing student activists. At the University of Cape Town, supposedly the ‘best’ university in Afrika, management has turned to repressive means and is intimidating and victimizing student activists. Outside of the gaze of the media and public scrutiny, Vice Chancellor Max Price and his deputies are silently executing a clear mandate: suffocate legitimate student protests by criminalizing, indefinitely suspending and expelling those the university regards as ring leaders instead of dealing with the issues raised by students. To date the University of Cape Town has: • Indefinitely suspended 3 student leaders from the university. • Indefinitely Interdicted 5 activists from accessing the university. Initially there were 16 students interdicted. • Charged 9 student activists through internal disciplinary procedures with the intention to expel Several students have now lost a whole term due to their suspensions and interdicts barring them from accessing the campus and it is predicted that UCT will target more black students. For black students access to higher education is political. Our histories have been shaped by poverty, a lack of human dignity and inequality due to being denied access to quality education. Furthermore, gaining access to higher education burdens us with the duty to break this cycle by actively challenging the neoliberal anti-black policies around housing, fees, institutional racism and patriarchy in order break open the ivory towers of higher learning for the majority of the people of this country. It is this cause that UCT is now criminalizing and victimizing black students for. We call on all progressive forces, parents, community leaders, alumni, civil society, politicians and the general public to put pressure on UCT management to lift the suspensions, remove the interdict and to seek alternative methods of resolving these conflicts so as to avoid denying students access to education at UCT.
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    Created by Lorde Sankara
  • Amadiba under attack
    For 10 years, Amadiba communities in the Eastern Cape have been fighting against a company trying to mine titanium in their area. Last week, the community leader was assassinated. This attack can’t be ignored. It’s hard to believe that a campaigner has been murdered for standing up against this international mining giant. Other members of the community who have been standing together to protect their area are fearful for their lives. A woman from the community said: “My tears won’t fall on the ground for nothing. You can bring your machine guns. I am prepared to die for my land, I am not going anywhere.” The MRC mining company are known to abuse human rights. They’ve been trying to mine this land for more than a decade. The community has used people power to block this international company. Now let's use people power to stand with the community.
    2,993 of 3,000 Signatures
    Created by Right 2 Know Picture
  • Campaign: #RISE one million signatures against sexual violence
    Campaign: #RISE one million signatures against sexual violence “The list ends here” Invitation Letter to sign a million signatures against sexual violence - the RISE’s Advocacy Event in connection with Sinoxolo Mafevuka’s rape & murder case - (24 Feb 2016) This letter serves as an official invitation to support the RISE Young Women’s Clubs Advocacy Campaign in Connection with Sinoxolo Mafevuka’s rape and murder case by signing this petition. The purpose of the event is to take a stance together against sexual violence. At Soul City Institute, we value and appreciate your department’s support in terms of creating safer communities where girls and young women in particular, are not affected by any type of sexual violence and/or its consequences. Hence we are indeed grateful. The event will be hosted by Soul City. The event will consist of the following main activities: #RISE one million signatures against sexual violence. Here the clubs (branded) will meet at the Khayelitsha mall and call out to the community members to sign a petition (on the poster –size papers) for no sexual violence against girls and women. This will take place on Thursday the 24th of March 2016 from 14h00 to 16h30. Your signature is about taking action in ending sexual violence and amplifying the voices of survivors of sexual violence and those at risk of being sexually violated. Be part of this movement and make your voice heard. This event is initiated by Soul City to eradicate sexual violence against women and girls in the Western Cape. We look forward to a continuing partnership with you.
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    Created by Nomfundo Eland
  • Booked for Hope
    This is a long term campaign that involves donating 15000+ books and setting up a libraries in various schools and development regions of Gauteng! Creating fun book clubs and end up having spelling bees in local schools. A child that reads is a nation that know..
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    Created by Ipeleng Malusi
  • Pads, bleeding the poor dry!
    Akhona is in grade eight. Like many of her classmates, she often misses school when she has her periods because her family cannot afford sanitary pads [1]. Akhona is not alone. On average in Mzansi. a girl will miss 60 days of school because of her period [2]. And some are forced to use socks, newspapers and worse because they can’t afford sanitary pads. Over time this can cause girls to drop-out completely. If they struggle through, they often find themselves unable to fully take part in school activities. Livity Africa's LiveVIPZA campaign, which initiated the parliament challenge, aims to present a plan in June on how to provide sanitary pads to low income communities to the Health Portfolio Committee. But the implementation requires that the Ministers of Basic Education, Health and Social Development kick start the plan. [1] I use a sock as a sanitary pad, says Langa learner http://www.groundup.org.za/article/i-use-sock-sanitary-pad-says-langa-learner_2418/ [2] Dignity Dreams article with information on how many girls miss school a month and in a year: http://www.ngopulse.org/organisation/dignity-dreams
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    Created by Livity Africa and Pontsho Pilane Picture
  • Reproductive justice now
    Young people were encouraged to register for the upcoming elections, but Noziziwe Buthelezi* won’t be voting in these elections or ever. She died last week after after a failed, unsafe abortion. While abortion is legal in South Africa, women like Noziziwe* are forced to risk their lives by using unsafe, illegal options. The posters advertising these fill our streets, yet most public institutions have no information about the safe, free alternatives available to women. If enough of us come together, we can demand that the National Department of Health (NDOH) upholds women’s right to access quality, affordable and acceptable sexual and reproductive healthcare services, including abortion. *Not her real name
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    Created by The Sexual & Reproductive Justice Coalition Picture
  • Early childhood development
    Children from age 1 to 6 got a very innovative education and my intake of children in 1 year is the proof that We provided a holistic education .
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    Created by Nisha Singh
  • Results of TVET Colleges to be taken as serious as those of Matric
    Students are delayed to complete their studies due to outstanding results. If one subject's results are not released, they can't register that subject at the next level. At the end, they will have to come back for a full semester (6 months) or trimester (3 months), for just one subject. This actually needs an enquiry or Public Protector intervention. This has been a problem for many many years, with no improvement.
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    Created by Lekolomi Seutloali
  • Stop food related illnesses: Food safety for all
    Between late 2017 and early 2018 our country went down in history for the biggest listeria outbreak in history, affecting over 1000 people and killing almost 300. Many families were robbed of their loved ones by the very thing they work to put on their table- food. Thousands of lives were affected by the decisions of a group of individuals employed by the biggest and most indispensable industry in the universe, its all good and well that the perpetrators are being held accountable for their actions and it is also commendable that they are cooperative and willing to attempt to compensate for the damage caused (though 300 fold irreversible)- my issue is not about corrective action, its in preventative action, the listeria outbreak should have opened our eyes to the fact that the giant that is our food industry is not indestructible, in fact in as much as the industry is one of our greatest assets, it can easily turn into our biggest serial killer, with unsuspecting civilians as its prey and deadly bacteria as its modus operandi- we need to implement not only corrective action but preventative action as well, surely we can't wait until another outbreak or more lives lost before we educate society that listeria is not the only food-related pathogen? That there are a handful of other deadly germs that are waiting for ideal conditions to pounce. I think Africa has always placed so much focus on food availability and food security and I feel that not enough emphasis has been placed on what we should look out for when we finally get our hands on food. We need to educate the general public on what to look out for, how to prepare and store food safely, what to do when they suspect food is unsafe etc to help prevent another negative world record again.
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    Created by Lydia Shoniwa-Sagonda
  • Sign to demand healthy food for [name of school] learners: MEC Panyaza Lesufi and MEC Dr Gwen Ram...
    Ensuring our children aren't hungry is our first priority as a community, but often the cheapest foods are unhealthy and can lead to health issues in our children, now and in the future, including type 2 diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, joint pain and certain cancers, which can be the result of lack of access to healthy food. We asked your school questions about what food most learners buy for lunch, and most said they buy kotas from vendors with sugary drinks. Learners also bought ice lollies, sweets and ice creams. This is not a balanced diet, and what we eat affects how much we can concentrate, and how sick we will get in the future. We use to have to just worry about HIV/AIDS, TB and other diseases, but now diseases like type 2 diabetes are increasing in our communities. The other reason we are getting sicker is because greedy junk food companies are aggressively marketing their products in our schools. But we can change this, if enough of us come together, we can ensure our voices are heard by the the MECs of Education and Health. If you don’t have email, you can join the campaign for free by dialing this code on your phone *134*1994*456#
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  • Stop riging Kagera donors condolences
    This goverment has been rigging it own funds/budget in the name of recostruction of the corrupt system but corruption is even growing in alarming speed and has been musterminded by the state itself.
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    Created by Antisedition Tanzania
  • Access to Railway Stations for old and disabled people.
    The bedrock of our nations is the older folk who suffered and endured the brunt of the apartheid regimefor years, who sacrificed their youth and who have contributed, in no small measure, to the economy of this country - yes they did! - are being marginalised because they are not spending hundreds of thousands of rands per annum on housing or holidays or shopping at the top boutiques. If they don't get to the baas' (white, black, brown or pink) house early enough, then the baas cannot go to work knowing that their kid(s) are safe, their house will be looked after and cleaned, the plumber/TV man/electrician will be given access to repair or install some new equipment/appliance. I want them to get the consideration and respect due to them!
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    Created by Randall Haupt Picture
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