• Cigarette companies make billions while our lines get longer. Increase the tobacco tax
    Each year South Africa spends more than R59 billion [1] to address tobacco related illnesses like lung cancer, emphysema, asthma and bronchitis. At the same time the country only collects between R11 billion and R13 billion from tobacco taxes. Last year South Africa’s largest tobacco company British American Tobacco alone took a profit of R2.3billion, after tax [2]. This means the South African taxpayer is paying for the healthcare bill of tobacco-related harm while the tobacco industry collects the profits. The only way to change this scenario is to substantially increase excise taxes on tobacco. In 2018, the finance minister increased the tobacco excise tax by just R1.22 for a pack of 20 cigarettes [3]– this translated to an increase of a mere R2.50 for someone who smokes two packets a week. Although this increase was in line with the CPI, it did little to reduce the affordability of cigarettes. And this small increase will not encourage a drop in consumption. The tobacco industry has constantly exaggerated the size of the illicit trade to put false pressure on tobacco tax policy. But 2014 research by UCT’s Professor Corne van Walbeek shows that the tobacco industry has been adjusting its estimates of the illicit trade to create the illusion that it has been rapidly growing [4]. Although he agrees that illicit trade exists, he says that if previous estimates by the tobacco industry were incorrect, the credibility of current estimates should be questioned. Illicit trade in South Africa can only be tackled through enforcement. This primarily comes from the criminal justice sector. But the Hawks and the National Prosecuting Authority have been in disarray and the South African Revenue Service has deliberately been undermined. As a result, enforcement has not taken place, particularly in the last six years. The long-term solution for South Africa is to implement the World Health Organisation’s Illicit Trade Protocol [5]. This calls for the use of an independent and effective system that regulates cigarette production, import, export and sale. South Africa signed the Protocol in 2013 [6] but has still not ratified or taken steps to implement it. What can be done? Prevention costs less than treatment. Prevention means reducing the number of smoker- and one of the most effective ways to do this is to increase the price of tobacco. This is how we can take back the tax that is spent on tobacco-related health harm. We call on the National Treasury to increase the excise tobacco tax to 70% of the current price of cigarettes and other tobacco products. This has been recommended by both the World Health Organisation and the World Bank [7]. It would make cigarettes more expensive and reduce consumption. And it will send a clear message to the tobacco industry that their attempts to undermine evidence-based healthy public policy are not successful. Tobacco taxes are a win-win for public health and public finances. References [1] The Tobacco Atlas - South Africa [2] BAT revenue rises but profit and market share fall. Robert Laing for Bizcommunity 28 JUL 2017 | [3] 2018 Budget Speech by Malusi GigabaMinister of Finance 21 February 2018 [4] Are the tobacco industry's claims about the size of the illicit cigarette market credible? The case of South Africa. 2014 Corné van Walbeek, Lerato Shai [5] WHO Protocol to Eliminate Illicit Trade in Tobacco Products [6] SA signs tobacco smuggling treaty. IOL, 11 JANUARY 2013 [7] TAXING TO PROMOTE PUBLIC GOODS: TOBACCO TAXES. World Bank
    1,558 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by National Council Against Smoking
  • Title deeds for the deserving residents of Pennyville flats
    The majority of people living in Pennyville are currently either unemployed or the families are child run or elderly run with most receiving grants. Most of them cannot afford the rentals and therefore in arrears amounting to thousands of rands. Attempts to address this matter with the relevant authorities have been unsuccessful.
    30 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Thabiso Seipobi Picture
  • Tell MTN to stop stalling #DataMustFall
    #DataMustFall got ICASA, the communications regulator, to introduce new rules that stop networks from chowing airtime when your bundle runs out, and making your data expire. But 24 hours before networks had to implement ICASA’s the new rules, Cell C made an urgent application to the court to stop the new ICASA regulations. MTN has joined Cell C in this action. ICASA has pushed back [1], but needs our help in creating public pressure to save millions of Mzansi’s people who continue to be pick pocketed by networks. Will you call on MTN to drop the legal action and comply with ICASA’s regulations? Recently, MTN announced a 200% data price increase [2]. It is hardly surprising that MTN are stalling the ICASA regulations given share prices have dropped by 53% over three years [3] They are trying to use the poor to maintain their profit margins and make returns for their shareholders. We know that MTN are merely stalling the regulations with this legal action- and we can beat them. Already, thousands of people across Mzansi joined the #DataMustFall campaign, and made submissions to ICASA on how these ridiculously high data prices affect them. Our actions resulted in regulations that will allow us to carry over unused data and not be charged high out-of-bundle rates without consent. With each month that passes without these regulations coming into effect, more money is robbed from our pockets. If we apply enough pressure on MTN as its customers, we could force them to back off this legal action and comply with the ICASA regulations. By emailing the CEO of MTN about his network’s actions, we will expose them to public scrutiny, creating a public backlash that could force them to drop their legal action. Will you sign? [1] ICASA Notes Cell C's Urgent Application To Review The Eussc Regulations. 7 June 2018. [2] Fans ready to cancel MTN after 200% data bundle price increase, Kyle Zeeman for TshisaLive. 17 July 2018. [3] SA telecoms shares come tumbling down, Tech Central. 27 June 2018.
    375 of 400 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Tell Vodacom to implement ICASA rules to make data last
    #DataMustFall got ICASA, the communications regulator, to introduce new rules that stop networks from chowing airtime when your bundle runs out, and making your data expire. But 24 hours before networks had to implement ICASA’s the new rules, Cell C made an urgent application to the court to stop the new ICASA regulations just hours before they were meant to be implemented. MTN and Telkom have joined Cell C in this action. ICASA has pushed back [1], but needs our help in creating public pressure to save millions of Mzansi’s people who continue to be ripped off with high data prices. While it doesn’t appear that Vodacom have joined MTN, Cell C and Telkom in taking legal action against ICASA over the regulations, they are benefiting from the regulations being delayed. Let’s demand Vodacom show leadership and implement the regulations. Will you call on Vodacom to immediately comply with ICASA’s regulations? The people of Mzansi voiced how they were affected by high data costs charged by the likes of Vodacom and other service providers. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), after public hearings, published End-User and Subscriber Service Charter Regulations which were meant to come into effect on 8 June 2018, relieving the enormous data costs we all face. It's not surprising networks want to undermine ICASA so our Data Must Fall campaign isn't successful. They have a lot to lose should the regulations be implemented. Last year, Vodacom reported that they make R2 billion per month from data alone [2]. Research shows that low income consumers are paying disproportionately high charges, and are not seeing benefits of competition in comparison to high income consumers who are able to buy larger quantities of data [3]. [1] ICASA Notes Cell C's Urgent Application To Review The Eussc Regulations. 7 June 2018. [2] Vodacom now makes R2 billion per month from data, My Broadband. Jan 31, 2018. [3] Izolo: mobile diaries of the less connected, Research report by Making All Voices Count. 20 Nov 2017. [4] MTN, Vodacom charging up to 2 639% more for out-of-bundle data - report, Kyle Venktess for Fin24. 12 march 2018.
    523 of 600 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Tell Cell C to stop stalling #DataMustFall
    #DataMustFall got ICASA, the communications regulator, to introduce new rules that stop networks from chowing airtime when your bundle runs out, and making your data expire. But 24 hours before networks had to implement ICASA’s the new rules, Cell C made an urgent application to the court to stop the new ICASA regulations just hours before they were meant to be implemented, them. Now, MTN has joined Cell C in this action. ICASA has pushed back [1], but needs our help to save millions of Mzansi’s people who continue to be ripped off with high data prices. We know that Cell C are merely stalling the regulations, and our savings, with this court action - and we can beat them. Already, thousands of people across Mzansi joined the #DataMustFall campaign, and made submissions to ICASA on how these ridiculously high data prices affect them. Our actions resulted in regulations that will allow us to carry over unused data and not be charged high out-of-bundle rates without consent. If Cell C [2] get their way, it could be a huge setback for our campaign to bring the cost of data down. ICASA is defending the regulations in court, but the networks could drag this matter out to ensure the regulations are never implemented. Already they have blocked ICASA’s ability to penalise networks for not complying with the regulations. Each month that passes without these regulations coming into effect, more money is robbed from our pockets. If we apply enough pressure on Cell C as customers, we could force them to back off this legal action and comply with the ICASA regulations. By emailing the CEO of Cell C about his network’s actions, we will expose them to scrutiny, creating a public backlash that could force them to drop their legal action. Will you sign? [1] ICASA Notes Cell C's Urgent Application To Review The Eussc Regulations. 7 June 2018. [2] Cellphone networks gear up for legal battle over Icasa data ruling, Cape Talk. 6 July 2018.
    151 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Tell Telkom to stop stalling #DataMustFall
    #DataMustFall got ICASA, the communications regulator, to introduce new rules that stop networks from chowing airtime when your bundle runs out, and making your data expire. But 24 hours before networks had to implement ICASA’s the new rules, Cell C made an urgent application to the court to stop the new ICASA regulations just hours before they were meant to be implemented, them. Telkom has also taken legal action. ICASA has pushed back [1], but needs our help in creating public pressure to save millions of Mzansi’s people who continue to be ripped off with high data prices. The people of Mzansi voiced how they were affected by high data costs charged by the likes of Telkom and other service providers. The Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), after public hearings, published End-User and Subscriber Service Charter Regulations which were meant to come into effect on 8 June 2018, relieving the enormous data costs we all face. Telkom said they welcome ICASA’s position on the need for fairness in business practice around data pricing and the expiry of data bundles [2]. And we need to make sure that they remain true to their word. Research shows that low income consumers are paying disproportionately high charges, and are not seeing benefits of competition in comparison to high income consumers who are able to buy larger quantities of data [3]. [1] ICASA Notes Cell C's Urgent Application To Review The Eussc Regulations. 7 June 2018. [2] New data rules: MTN‚ Vodacom‚ Cell C and Telkom respond, Adiel Ismail for Fin24. 29 April 2018. [3] Izolo: mobile diaries of the less connected, Research report by Making All Voices Count. 20 Nov 2017. [4] MTN, Vodacom charging up to 2 639% more for out-of-bundle data - report, Kyle Venktess for Fin24. 12 march 2018.
    174 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Stop taxing my period
    Thousands of amandla. mobi members have fought hard to make free sanitary products a reality for millions of girls. Unfortunately, for the households that could put a few rands together to buy a pack, the VAT hike announced earlier this year has made it even more expensive, meaning more people who need sanitary towels could go without. But right now, we have an opportunity to change that. Public submissions to the expert panel investigating the expansion of zero rating to more items was extended. But it ends on June 4, 2018. Send the panel a direct message telling them to recommend that sanitary products are included in the list of essential zero-rated products. People who get periods will buy up to 17 000 sanitary pads or tampons in their lifetime [1]. This basically means that the average person could spend up to almost R40 000 on sanitary pads in that time [2]. This in a country in which over 50% of the population live in poverty. The VAT hike has had an impact on the cost of living in Mzansi. People are spending much more on essential food items, reducing how much they have for other needs. And living a decent, dignified life requires so much more than food. Our community exists to primarily protect us, Black women. You, and over two hundred thousand others have taken action to make this real. And we need you to once again stand with us and make sure the panel recommends dropping the tax on our periods. [1] A guide to 'alternative menstruation': Save money and the world during your period, Pontsho Pilane for Bhekisisa. 31 Oct 2016. [2] Why treasury won't support a fall in the tampon tax, Pontsho Pilane for Bhekisisa. 5 Dec 2016.
    673 of 800 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Isolate Apartheid Israel!
    South Africans were horrified by the targeted shooting of peaceful protesters in Gaza by the Israeli Defence Force that left around 60 people dead and many hundreds wounded on 14 May 2018. It was seen for what it is – a coldblooded massacre, reminding us when we were shot down for peacefully protesting against apartheid in Sharpeville and again in 1976 in Soweto when children were shot and killed. This was not the first time the Israeli occupation force has carried out atrocities and it won’t be the last unless the world acts now. It was only by internationally isolating apartheid South Africa in support of popular uprisings, strikes and armed struggle that we were able to put enough pressure on the regime. Likewise, we need to intensify pressure on our government to immediately cut diplomatic ties with racist Israel, signalling to the world – and especially to the Palestinian people – that we have not forgotten their support for us during our Struggle. Merely recalling our Ambassador is not sufficient. We must cut all diplomatic ties, expel the Israeli Ambassador from Pretoria and heed the call of the international BDS movement and demand complete trade sanctions; sport, cultural and academic boycotts; disinvestment and an arms embargo in support of Palestine that belongs to all who live in it. Since 1994, South Africans have called on the government to impose comprehensive sanctions against the apartheid Israeli regime: • a ten thousand strong march in Durban during the United Nation’s World Conference Against Racism in 2001 where the “Second Anti-Apartheid Movement” was declared and a boycott, divestment and sanctions campaign against Israel adopted by representatives of South African civil society led by prominent liberation movement veterans; • an equally strong march at the World Summit on Sustainable Development in 2002 in support of the Palestinian struggle and against the presence of an Israeli delegation including Shimon Peres; • the refusal of dock workers in the port city of Durban to offload an Israeli ship in 2009 in the wake of Israel’s ‘Cast Lead’ assault on Gaza • the decision in 2011 by the Senate of the University of Johannesburg to sever ties with Ben Gurion University. • On the 9th of August 2014, between 150 000 to 200 000 South Africans marched in Cape Town against atrocities in Gaza and for full sanctions against Israel. It was the biggest march in South Africa’s history and continues solidarity activity since the first South African democratic elections in 1994. • The Council of the Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) resolved that TUT would not forge any ties with the State of Israel or any of its organisations and institutions on the 24th of November 2017. In 2014 President Zuma sent Aziz Pahad as a ‘peace envoy’ to Israel. We still have not received the outcome of Pahad’s trip. At the same time Deputy President Cyril Ramaphosa, answering questions in the National Council of Provinces, called for “constructive engagement” with Israel – a phrase used by Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher to justify their relations with apartheid South Africa. It is clear that Israel is not interested in peace as it continues to violate international law. The ANC Conference in 2017 adopted a resolution to downgrade our Embassy in Tel Aviv. President Ramaphosa has subsequently, on more than one occasion, reminded South Africans of the ANC resolution as a matter that government has to deal with. Minister Naledi Pandor, in the debate following State President Ramaphosa’s SONA address in February, went further and said that South Africa will “cut diplomatic ties” with Israel. We now demand implementation! We call on the South African government to: * Permanently recall our ambassador from Israel; * Expel the Israeli ambassador from South Africa; * Prosecute South African citizens that join the Israeli army in any capacity; * Stop SAA code sharing with Israeli airline 'El Al'; * Prohibit South African companies from trading with Israel; * Prohibit Israeli funding of South African political parties; * Work to persuade African Union member countries to adopt similar policies; * Engage with all South African organisations in the Palestinian solidarity movement. For more information please contact pscgauteng@gmail.com
    26,956 of 30,000 Signatures
    Created by Roshan Dadoo
  • 24 hours to have VAT removed from more essential items
    Before the VAT increase kicked in on 1 April 2018, National Treasury had announced that it would set up a panel of experts to consider and review the country’s current list of items that have been zero rated for VAT. We know that the VAT increase has hit the poor and those who rely on social grants, the hardest. National Treasury set up an independent expert panel to look into removing VAT from more items and is calling for submissions. But we have only 24 hours to do this. We can pressure government to review the current list of zero rated items so that we give some relief to poor households. Currently, Mzansi has 19 basic food items on the zero rated list [1]. This includes dried beans, samp, maize meal, rice, milk, tinned pilchards, brown bread, eggs and vegetables, as well as illuminated paraffin. The zero rating does not apply to items such as sanitary products, soap, stationary, margarine and school uniforms to name a few. The poor cannot live off just 19 zero rated items. Many of our leaders seem to acknowledge that the VAT increase is a problem, and we can use this moment to continue to reduce the impact of the VAT hike on the poor, while working towards holding Treasury and Parliament to account. [1] Zero-rated and exempt supplies, National Treasury website. [2] https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/News/treasury-calls-for-publics-input-on-adding-items-to-zero-rated-vat-list-20180517
    1,489 of 2,000 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member
  • Zara pay back the money to Laduma Ngxokolo
    Ma'Afrika, Ours is a history of ongoing exploitation from white monopoly capital, and this time the brand Zara has decided to appropriate Laduma Ngoxolo's designs, by distributing his socks on their website (which they have since taken down). Despite this a small town boy, who worked extremely hard building his business in the Eastern Cape has to utilize his resources to take on an established multi-billion dollar company that tried to rip him off. Since Laduma will have to use his own resources, it is time for South Africans to come together to create a dent in the Zara wallet. Cultural appropriation and exploitation is a tale as old as time, where white capital benefits from the knowledge created in indigenous communities. Boycott all Zara stores in order to send a clear message that we will not tolerate the exploitation of our artists and our people! #BoycottZara #LocalArtMatters #LocalArtistsMatter [1] Press release from Select Committees Chairperson: https://www.parliament.gov.za/press-releases/select-committees-chairperson-welcomes-zaras-decision-remove-copied-designs [2] Press release from MaXhosa by Laduma https://www.facebook.com/MAXHOSA/posts/1592432134158921
    31 of 100 Signatures
    Created by P M
  • Tell UNISA to include Black women on land expropriation discussion
    Women in South Africa are more than 50%of the population. The issue of land is important to us as citizens with full rights in this country. Women are also thinkers, opinion leaders and represent an important an essential voice in the discourse about land in this country. It is therefore unfathomable that the panel UNISA has constituted to discuss this issue is male, with one woman panelist. It undermines the views of women in decision-making and excludes a large constituency from a critical debate in the country, consequently treating them as 2nd class citizens. We implore you to desist from this form of secondary Apartheid and victimisation of women. We are equal citizens and our input is not only important but necessary.
    33 of 100 Signatures
    Created by Lebogang Ramafoko Picture
  • Support the striking Simba workers!
    As labour-brokered workers under Adcorp Blu, their core demand is to win their right to be made permanent workers of Simba, with better wages and benefits. Parliament changed section 198 of the Labour Relations Act in 2015 to give labour-brokered workers the right to become the permanent employees of the client companies after three months of work. ‘The majority of us workers are women,’ said worker leader Nthabiseng Shai. We want to be Simba people, but we still say Simba must fall!’ The workers are fed up with the way Simba has mistreated them to dodge and undermine the right the law gives them. ‘Some of us have been working here for more than five years,’ explained Shai. ‘They don’t want to make us permanent. They are changing us from a labour broker to another, from Adcorp Blu to FunxionO.’ The workers decided to strike when Simba again changed their employment contracts without consulting them. The Simba Workers Forum is calling on the public to support them. Please contact PepsiCo, the parent company of Simba, and tell them to give the workers permanent jobs: Call the toll free number 0800980063 This campaign is in collaboration with the Casual Workers Advice Office
    132 of 200 Signatures
    Created by Amandla.mobi Member